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Teen Accidentally Shoots, Kills 14-Year-Old Brother

Teen Accidentally Shoots, Kills 14-Year-Old Brother

Censored Super Bowl Ad Upsets Veteran’s Group

Censored Super Bowl Ad Upsets Veteran’s Group

Hawaii Governor Forgot Twitter Password, Couldn't Update Missile Alert

Hawaii Governor Forgot Twitter Password, Couldn't Update Missile Alert

Florida DA seeks death penalty in Tampa serial killings

Florida prosecutors said they will seek the death penalty for a 24-year-old man they say is responsible for randomly killing four people in a Tampa neighborhood will face the death penalty, according to news reports. 

>> Read more trending news

Howell Emanuel Donaldson III was charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of Benjamin Mitchell, 22; Monica Hoffa, 32; Anthony Naiboa, 20; and Ronald Felton, 60. 

“The death penalty is for the worst of the worst, crimes that are far more egregious than the typical murder, and that’s what we have here,” Hillsborough State Attorney Andrew Warren said at a 10:30 a.m. news conference Tuesday, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

The four victims were shot dead in October and November, sparking a manhunt in the Seminole Heights neighborhood. 

>> Who is Howell Emanuel Donaldson III?

Donaldson was arrested Nov. 28 after he handed a coworker at McDonald’s a bag with a pistol inside. The coworker then alerted police, who made the arrest.

The Tampa Police Department said that evidence later taken from the handgun connects it to all four murders, the Times reported. 

During the news conference, Warren said that his office decided to pursue the death penalty due to several factors. He said that Donaldson killed four innocent people in a “cold, calculated and premeditated manner” and that there is no evidence showing he is mentally ill. 

The defendant’s parents, Rosita and Howell Donaldson Jr., face civil contempt charges because of their refusal to answer prosecutors’ questions about their son, the Times reported.

2018 Oscars Top Nominations

2018 Oscars Top Nominations

What You Need To Know About Jordan Peele

What You Need To Know About Jordan Peele

Police - Students on Playground Run Away From Naked PE Teacher.

Police - Students on Playground Run Away From Naked PE Teacher

Fans Of Alabama Taco Bell That Burned Down Hold Vigil

Fans Of Alabama Taco Bell That Burned Down Hold Vigil

Man From Michigan Threatens To Murder CNN Employees

Man From Michigan Threatens To Murder CNN Employees

Florida College Student Says Man Tried To Grab Her In Parking Garage

Florida College Student Says Man Tried To Grab Her In Parking Garage

12-Year-Old In Armed Carjacking At Walmart Charged As Adult

12-Year-Old In Armed Carjacking At Walmart Charged As Adult

Michigan Woman Having Financial Troubles Wins Lottery

Michigan Woman Having Financial Troubles Wins Lottery

'Tide Pod Challenge' causes some retailers to lock up product

The viral challenge that involves people filming themselves biting into laundry detergent pods is causing some retailers to take security measures to prevent people from shoplifting the product, WTSP reported.

>> Read more trending news

The so-called Tide Pod Challenge has prompted a warning from U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which said ingesting the pods can cause them to dissolve quickly and release highly concentrated toxic contents.

Saturday, a student at Utah State University was hospitalized after ingesting a Tide Pod.

“It’s just people being stupid and misusing products,” shopper Taylor Alexander told WTSP as he browsed the aisles in a Florida Walmart.

The Tampa store where Alexander shops has put anti-theft devices on the pod containers, and has posted signed warning customers that the area is under video surveillance, WTSP reported.

In some areas of the country, the pods have been locked up, putting them in the classification of alcohol, medicines and electronics, which require a store employee to open the case to sell the product.

“Alcohol, certain medicines, we just bought medicine that we had to share ideas for. That's reasonable. Laundry detergent, no,” Walmart customer Gina Trina told WTSP.

Officials at Walgreens said they have done the same thing for years. However, spokesman James Graham told WTSP that the safeguards for the laundry detergent pods are “unrelated to more recent reports of misuse of the products."

Dr. Fred Aleguas, who is in charge of the Tampa Poison Control Center, says the pods were already dangerous, but that the Tide Pod Challenge has caused a spike in the number of poisoning cases.

“I think it's a good idea, in light of the fact that we've had such a significant increase,” he told WTSP.

At Least Two Dead, More Than A Dozen Injured In Kentucky High School Shooting

VIDEO: Shooting Reported At Kentucky High School

VIDEO: 5 Missing After Oklahoma Natural Gas Well Catches Fire

VIDEO: 5 Missing After Oklahoma Natural Gas Well Catches Fire

Record Executive And Producer Arrested On Georgia Highway

Record Executive And Producer Arrested On Georgia Highway

What You Need To Know About Neil Diamond

What You Need To Know About Neil Diamond

What You Need to Know: Tsunamis

What You Need to Know: Tsunamis

Woman Smashes Car Into McDonald's Window

Woman Smashes Car Into McDonald's Window

Tsunami Warning Canceled After 7.9 Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Alaska Coast

8.2 Magnitude Earthquake Off Alaska Coast Causes Tsunami Warning
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