Now Playing
99.5 KISS FM
Last Song Played
The Concert Authority
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
99.5 KISS FM
Last Song Played
The Concert Authority

religion

172 items
Results 21 - 30 of 172 < previous next >

Town sued for placing cross on top of Christmas tree

Matt Naham contributed to this report.

An Indiana town was sued for a Christmas tree display. 

>> Read more trending stories  

According to WXIN, Joseph Tompkins, a resident of Knightstown, Indiana, enlisted the help of the American Civil Liberties Union to sue the town after it topped a public Christmas tree display with a cross instead of a star. The lawsuit claimed the topper was a violation of the First Amendment because it blurred the lines between separation of church and state.

"The cross is the best known symbol of Christianity and Knightstown's prominent display of this symbol represents an establishment of religion in violation of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution," the complaint said.

The lawsuit demanded that the town compensate Tompkins for being "forced to come into direct and unwelcome contact with the cross display" every day. Tompkins said he objected "to any of his tax dollars going to pay for the erection or maintenance of the display or the lighting of it," according to court documents.

But residents of the town opposed Tompkins' argument.

"Just because one person's offended, doesn't mean they have to take away one particular thing," resident Cynthia Sturgill told WXIN.

<iframe width="390" height="219" src="http://launch.newsinc.com/?type=VideoPlayer/Single&amp;widgetId=1&amp;trackingGroup=69016&amp;playlistId=19132&amp;siteSection=rare&amp;videoId=31732484" frameborder="no" scrolling="no" noresize marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen></iframe>

Other residents disagreed with Tompkins' claim and said that the display wasn't religious. 

"To me, it's not a religious display," Sturgill told WXIN. "It's not all about just Christianity. It's about memorial, loss of family, loved ones, the veterans."

To combat the lawsuit, Knightstown resident Patricia Hutson crafted more than 200 wooden crosses to hand out for free to send a message. People also put crosses in their yards, stores, windows and cars, according to WXIN. 

"I just thought we should rebel some way or let him know how we feel," Hutson told WXIN. "I hope they make people realize that we should speak up for what we believe in and stand up for it and not be pushed around."

A group gathered Sunday night to express support for the cross-topped tree Sunday night. 

Monday morning, a Facebook page for the town announced the cross had been taken down.

"It is with regret and sadness that the Knightstown Town Council has had the cross removed from the Christmas tree on the town square and is expected to approve a resolution at the next council meeting stating they will not return the cross to the tree," the council said in a Facebook post."

<script>(function(d, s, id) {  var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];  if (d.getElementById(id)) return;  js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;  js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&amp;version=v2.8";  fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script> This statement was just released by the Knightstown Town Council: It is with regret and sadness that the Knightstown...Posted by Knightstown news and events on Monday, December 12, 2016

Tompkins told WXIN he wasn't offended by the cross, but rather valued upholding the First Amendment.

The Cross will come down, but we can still light the town with crosses.  Look on the bright side, instead of just one...Posted by Knightstown news and events on Monday, December 12, 2016

Read more at WXIN.

WATCH: Boy 'rescues' Baby Jesus, Nativity scene from cold outdoors

Many people display Nativity scenes in their yard for the holiday season, but one boy was perplexed to see Baby Jesus, Mary and Joseph out in the cold.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

>> Read more trending stories

A video posted last week by Rumble user Gregory Hogan shows the boy working for several minutes to carry the three statuettes to his front door. Then he brings them inside.

>> Click here to watch the heartwarming video

Source: Little boy unhappy that Baby Jesus & Family are out in the cold by gregoryhogan on Rumble

Jesus statue still standing after wildfire destroys Tennessee home

Not a day goes by that it doesn’t seem like more bad news comes from the ashes of the recent wildfires in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. While numbers continue to rise, The Associated Press reports that 14 people are dead and 134 injured.

But one sight is giving some residents hope.

>> After wildfires, Dollywood worker finds lone, charred Bible page at park

According to CNN, a television crew was recently on the ground in Sevier County, where several homes burned to the ground. But the crew came across a statue of Jesus still standing among the ruins of a house.

The story touched country music singer Brad Paisley, who recently tweeted a link to the article with the simple words, "Finding some hope within the ashes."

>> Read more trending stories

This wasn't the only heavenly sight amid the rubble. A theme park employee said he found a charred Bible page while cleaning up the mostly spared Dollywood, whose very own Dolly Parton has pledged to financially help the families affected until they can begin to get back on their feet.

New Catholic app is good for the soul

For Catholics of a certain age, absolution was a weekly ritual. Confessing one’s sins in the privacy of a dark cubicle is a tradition of the religion that exists to this day.

>> Read more trending stories

So for those Catholics on the go, an archbishop from Scotland launched a new smartphone and tablet app on Tuesday that enables parishioners to find a confessional. The Catholic app is nicknamed “Sindr” because it uses the same software as dating app Tinder. Sindr is expected to go live in early 2017, according to Vatican Radio. The idea was inspired by Pope Francis’ designation of 2016 as the Extraordinary Year of Jubilee.

“The idea was really inspired by the Holy Father himself,” Edinburgh’s Archbishop Leo Cushley, who announced the launch, told Vatican Radio. “He said to be imaginative about what to do for the Holy Year of Mercy.”

“I hope everyone’s going to use it.”

Cushley launched the app at St. Peter’s in Rome and called it “a smart bit of technology.” He told The Telegraph that the app could impact “how the Catholic Church brings the mercy of God and the joy of the Gospel to our contemporary world.”

Muslim ban statement disappears from Trump's website

Part of Donald Trump's promise to "make America great again" has been to address Muslim-American relations. 

>> Read more trending stories  

"Donald J. Trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country's representatives can figure out what is going on," Trump posted on his website on Dec. 7, 2015. "According to Pew Research, among others, there is great hatred towards Americans by large segments of the Muslim population."

The statement, titled "Donald J. Trump statement on preventing Muslim immigration," called for a "a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States." 

"Without looking at the various polling data, it is obvious to anybody the hatred is beyond comprehension," the statement read. "Where this hatred comes from and why we will have to determine. Until we are able to determine and understand this problem and the dangerous threat it poses, our country cannot be the victims of horrendous attacks by people that believe only in Jihad, and have no sense of reason or respect for human life."

But the statement was removed from the website "around Election Day on Tuesday," according to Reuters.

Trump's list of his potential Supreme Court justice picks and certain details of his economic, defense and regulatory reform plans were also deleted, as were dozens of campaign newsreleases, endorsements and announcements. 

The page that housed the statement temporarily redirected to a page that promoted campaign fundraising. 

"The website was temporarily redirecting all specific press release pages to the homepage," the Trump campaign told The Washington Post in a statement. "It is currently being addressed and will be fixed shortly." 

The page was restored Thursday afternoon.

In a March interview with CNN, Trump said he believes that "Islam hates us."

"There’s something there that -- there's a tremendous hatred there," he said. "There's a tremendous hatred. We have to get to the bottom of it. There's an unbelievable hatred of (Americans)."

Researchers excavate Jesus' tomb

Archeologists and restoration teams are getting to the innermost chamber of the tomb that held Jesus. 

Many thought the cave where the faithful laid Jesus' body after he was taken down from the crucifix was destroyed ages ago, but after digging through marble and using ground-penetrating radar, an archeologist confirmed that the cave existed, The Associated Press reported.

"We can't say 100 percent, but it appears to be visible proof that the location of the tomb has not shifted through time, something that scientists and historians have wondered for decades." Fredrik Hiebert, National Geographic's archaeologist-in-residence said.

"This is the Holy Rock that has been revered for centuries, but only now can actually be seen," Antonia Moropoulou said. Moropoulou is in charge of the conservation and restoration of the Edicule, the chamber that houses the cave where Jesus was entombed and and believed by Christians to be resurrected, now under the Church of the Holy Sepluchre

The church dates back to the 12th century and sits on top of 4th-century remains. Six different Christian denominations practice their faith at the same site.

>> Read more trending stories  

The Edicule was last restored in 1810 after a fire. Now it is in need of reinforcement after exposure to humidity and candle smoke, The AP reported.

It was reinforced in 1947 by a British team using an iron cage built around the cave, but it is not enough.

This week, workers slid open a marble slab hoping to reach the chamber itself. The marble hadn't been moved since 1550. Under that, they found debris and another slab. That slab dates to the 12th century and covered another layer, National Geographic reported.

<iframe width="615"height="346" src="//assets.ngeo.com/modules-video/latest/assets/ngsEmbeddedVideo.html?guid=00000158-03a5-d936-ab7c-7fe763f00000" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen></iframe>

The team had a total of 60 hours to excavate the inner tomb. It was closed after being fully documented, resealed in the original marble, National Geographic reported.

One part of the tomb will be visible to pilgrims. Experts cut a window in one of the Edicule's marble walls to they can see part of the limestone wall of the tomb. It is the first time the faithful can glimpse the tomb, The AP reported.

National Geographic documented the site on video. 

Read more on the discovery here and here.

WATCH: Man's video of heavenly sight in clouds goes viral

A South Carolina man's video of a heavenly figure in the sky is going viral.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

According to "Today," Cory Hearon, 37, captured a Facebook Live video of a cloud that resembles an angel hovering over the city of Camden. 

>> Read more trending stories

"I almost didn't video it," Hearon said. "It was the first time I had seen something that remarkable with my own two eyes."

The clip has been shared more than 260,000 times and has more than 7.5 million views. 

Read more here.

>> Click here to watch

<script>(function(d, s, id) {</span><br /><span>  var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];</span><br /><span>  if (d.getElementById(id)) return;</span><br /><span>  js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;</span><br /><span>  js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&amp;version=v2.8";</span><br /><span>  fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);</span><br /><span>}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script> AngelPosted by Cory Hearon on Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Tennessee mom opposes textbook that includes Islam

A Tennessee mother is objecting to a social studies textbook used in her local school district, alleging that it promotes Islam.

>> Read more trending stories  

Speaking at a Sullivan County School Board meeting on Monday night, Michelle Edmisten demanded that the district remove the textbook. Edmisten claimed that her seventh-grade daughter’s “personal religious beliefs were violated” with lessons about Islam, the Kingsport Times News reported.

Edmisten said that her daughter, who attends Bluff City Middle School in Blountville, took zeros on the section on Islamic history after a teacher didn’t allow her to opt out of the curriculum and standards and do alternative studies.

Those are zeros that we proudly took and we will not compromise,” Edmisten said.  

Edmisten was the only parent to speak about the issue. 

Director of Schools Evelyn Rafalowski and Board of Education Chairman Michael Hughes said the system is exploring a religious accommodation option since there is no “opt out” allowed in Tennessee.

The school board said any replacement textbook would have to meet current state standards. According to the state board of education’s website, those standards include educating students about Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism and Hinduism in the sixth grade, and Islam in the seventh grade.

The National Council for the Social Studies called the study of religions an “essential” part of the curriculum.

The religious economy is worth $1.2 trillion

How much is religion worth?

The answer is more than megacompanies Apple and Microsoft make in a year combined.

recent study of the U.S. faith economy found religious goods, services and institutions are worth $1.2 trillion a year.

>> Read more trending stories  

Religion might affect America's economy more than you realize. Congregations alone employ hundreds of thousands of people and purchase billions of dollars in goods.

Faith-based elementary schools receive over $15 billion in tuition annually, and that doesn't include middle schools or high schools.

Kosher and halal food sales account for almost another $15 billion. The study's authors didn't include holiday-centered food sales, either, like your usual Christmas dinner menu. That would dramatically increase the faith economy's worth.

Religious health care networks also bring in over $160 billion each year.

Plus, 20 of America's 50 largest charities are faith-based -- accounting for another $45 billion.

The researchers acknowledged their $1.2 trillion estimate is actually a conservative one. Their figure didn't account for the value of religious groups' physical or financial assets, which could make the estimate significantly bigger.

172 items
Results 21 - 30 of 172 < previous next >